Kate Atkin was born in 1981 in Odstock, Wiltshire. Whilst studying for an MA in photography at the Royal College of Art, London (2003-05), she began to explore new ways of expressing her interest in the exotic and incongruous. Often using natural forms such as roots, rocks and flowers, her work presents familiar forms in a new state of isolation removed from their surroundings to appear as microscopic-like floating islands.

Atkin describes the process behind her early drawings as an epiphany, releasing her from the photographic medium. She now uses photography more as a documentary tool to start her work. From different positions, she takes photos of her selected subjects at curious angles, using these initial images as sketches to work from on a much larger scale. Atkin imagines when a drawing might be fully finished and stops work a day before, leaving an unresolved quality which allows the image to breathe. She lives and works in London.

About her work, Atkin says: "My drawings are large, mostly in black and white, and very labour-intensive. I spend a lot of time working up-close and then walking as far away from it as possible to see it at a distance. Close-up, a lot of my work is teeming and chaotic. From a distance it has a sort of geography.

"I admire artists who look like they don't hold back, artists who have an idea and by the end of the day they've got it done and moved on to the next thing. It's basically the opposite of the way I work. I chew on stuff for ages before I can act. I'm like a tank blitzing along. Some artists are like a row of archers."